A Fall to Remember (Part 2)

Part 1 was when Silver fell almost 20 $ an ounce within a week. Like, 40%. Swoosh. Remember? Happened very recently.

And now, Gold does a Silver, and falls 20 % in a few days. These are the signs of the times. “Quick volatility” is the new “rangebound move”. Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

The wrong question here is “What’s a good entry level in general?” Why is this question wrong?

When something new becomes the norm, there is too little precedence to adhere to. It becomes dangerous to use entry rules which were established using older conditions as a standard.

I believe there is one way to go here. The correct question for me, were I seeking entry into Gold or Silver, would be “Is this entry level good enough FOR ME?” or perhaps “What’s a good enough entry level FOR ME?”

Let’s define “good” for ourselves. Here, “good” is a level at which entry doesn’t bother YOU. It doesn’t bother you, because you are comfortable with the level and with the amount you are entering. You don’t need this sum for a while. It is a small percentage of what you’ve got pickled in debt, yielding very decent returns. If the underlying slides further after your entry, your “good” level of entry still remains “good” till it starts bothering you. You can widen the gap between “not-bothering” and “bothering” by going ahead with a small entry at your “good” level, and postponing further entry for an “even better” level which might or might not come.

If the”even better” level arrives, you go ahead as planned, and enter with a little more. If, however, your “good” level was the bottom, and prices zoom after that, you stick to your plan and do not enter after that. This would be an investment entry strategy, which sigularly looks for a margin of safety. Entry is all-important while investing, as opposed to when one is trading (while trading, trade-management and exit are more important than entry).

Trading entry strategies are totally different. Here, one looks to latch on after the bottom is made and the underlying is on the rise. Small entries can be made as each resistance is broken. It’s called pyramiding. Trading strategies are mostly the complete opposite of investing strategies. Please DO NOT mix the two.

Sort yourself out. What do you want to do? Do you want to invest in Gold and Silver, or do you want to trade in them? ANSWER this question for yourself. Once you have the answer, formulate your strategy accordingly. U – good level – how much here? U – even better level – how much there? U – no more entry – after which level?

Life is so much simpler when one has sorted oneself out and then treads the path.

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A Fall to Remember

Ok, these are big drops in the values of commodities. Especially Silver.

Actually, I’m liking it.

No, I am not short Silver, or short Oil, or short Gold.

As far as commodities go, I don’t trade in them, I invest in them.

And as Silver falls big time, I am buying shares of Silver mining companies. Small amounts, nothing big. One needs to tread carefully. Because one doesn’t know when prices will stabilize.

Prices were way too high earlier to go ahead with these purchases. But, as Silver falls, one starts getting a margin of safety in Silver mining companies. I feel this has just started happening. Which is not to say that Silver won’t fall more.

Which is when I’ll buy more.

This is long-term investing. Here, the ideology is the complete opposite of trading.

Strategies for Correcting Silver – One Approach

Mega rallies are followed by big drawdowns in a bull market.

That’s how it is.

Anyone who doesn’t understand this will be made to understand it. The market doesn’t care about one’s emotions.

In today’s bull markets, a volatile entity like Silver can correct by 9 $ an ounce within a few days. Let’s accept the fact that this has happened, because it has.

So how does one play correcting Silver?

A bull market ceases to be a bull market below a certain price level as per Dow theory. That hasn’t happened yet, so a trader, in my opinion, still needs to play the long side. Of course with a stop. And not any odd stop. A risk-profile tuned stop with trigger activation, and with a large difference between trigger price and limit price. This is because Silver is moving very big either way currently within a very short time span, and if trigger and limit aren’t separated by a huge gap, they can both be overshot and the poor trader can be left hanging in the losing trade, holding on to his pants.

The investor, on the other hand, is waiting patiently for Silver to reach a certain level of correction before buying bullion. Opinions vary what this level should be. My opinion is that a 61.8% Fibonacci correction level should suffice for entry. I think that’s happening now, so if Silver stabilizes at or near the current price (40.84 $ an ounce), that would be my price for a medium term entry.

Of course I could be all wrong.

I like to make mistakes, because they are the best teachers. Better that any professors or theoreticians.

Is Silver in a Bubble?

When the chauffeur or even the doorman has an opinion, the underlying asset-class is in a bubble.

That’s my definition of a bubble.

And that’s not the case for Silver yet.

A bubble is something psychological. The mind gets twisted into believing that one’s found the holy grail. And then one can’t get enough of it.

Bill Bonner predicted in the year 2000, that Silver and Gold would be the trades of then commencing decade. What a prediction! He went on to say that in the last stages of its run, Gold would rise at the rate of 100$ an hour. You can proportionate that for Silver. That’s how a real bubble behaves. Just go back to first quarter of 2000 and observe the financial behaviour of dotcoms.

This is not a bubble yet. We are nowhere near bubble behaviour. The common households have not started selling off their household Silver. The man on the streets is not obsessed with Silver as of now. (I still look at common-man behaviour, even for Silver, because in a bubble, one forgets affordability. Apart from that, Silver can be bought by the gram).

So, where does one go from here?

Simple.

The trader keeps trading with the flow and an appropriate, risk-profile-tuned stop. For heavens sake, he or she needs to be long.

And the investor keeps buying small stakes on dips.

Nothing fancy or complicated. A simple, common-sense strategy is all that’s required.