Making Forex Go on Auto W/o Software Robotics

Charts.

Chart.

Identification…

…of trade.

Trigger Entry.

Feed in entry level.

Trigger Stop.

Choose between dynamic and fixed stop.

I like the fixed stop that keeps raising itself in chunks, chunk after chunk.

However, you might prefer a dynamic stop.

Trigger Limit. Not necessarily a must.

Put trade on.

Entry triggers.

You are now live…

…and your forex is now on auto,…

… whereby you’ve not used a software robot to achieve this.

Well done!

🙂

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And Now, We’re Not Looking

Who’s not looking?

We. Stock people.

What are we not looking at?

Wrong question. We’re always looking at stocks.

Ok. What are we not looking for?

New stocks.

Why?

Our magic number has been hit.

What’s this magic number?

That’s the number of stocks we wish to handle.

Is it the same for everyone?

No, it’s different for everyone.

How does one arrive at this number?

Through hit and trial. Whatever that works. Where you feel good, that’s your number.

So, will your portfolio now stagnate?

No. Most definitely not. If a stock is not interesting anymore, it can always be replaced.

How does one go about doing that?

Wait for a market high. Then discard the stock you are not interested in anymore.

And how does one find a new stock in a scenario where one is not looking?

You let the stock find you.

Meaning?

You’re not looking, but something eventually hits you in the eye.

Aaahhhh.

Then you dig deeper. If all criteria are met…

…you enter.

Rriiighht….!

… And Why Growth Stocks…?

Well, why not?

We’ve got History on our side.

Buffett shifted a tad from value to growth in the latter part of his career.

Forget about all that.

We get into growth because we wish to get into growth.

We’re not buying at growth prices, mind you.

Our value background comes in handy. We use value techniques to pick up growth.

We continue to accumulate upon opportunity, quantum by quantum.

Our portfolio gets rounded.

Over the long run, its gets a bit of a boost.

Ideally, we’d like our growth stories to continue, forever.

Consider this. What if even one of our holdings makes it to a 1000-bagger?

What do you think this would do to our portfolio?

Exactly.

Lots that starts out as value becomes growth later.

We pick value with growth in mind.

Sometimes, we’re not offered value in something we want to pick, for a long, long time.

We’re not offered value in the traditional sense of the way we expect value to be.

At these times we evaluate.

Is this something to “wantable” that we have to have it, like Buffett and Coca Cola?

No?

Continue as normal.

Yes?

Create new criteria for value, within growth.

Enter only when these criteria prevail, quantum by quantum.

Sit on your growth holding. Don’t just exit in a growth fashion, upon any odd market high.

Exits are reserved for when you comprehensively don’t want the stock anymore.

Why’s it not stinging you when there is a correction?

Meaning, that growth stocks fall considerably during corrections.

Well, firstly, you are not using money that you might need in the foreseeable future.

Then, the correction is an entry opportunity, so instead of being glum, you are busy going about entering.

Thirdly, because you are entering quantum by quantum, you have tremendous entry potential still left, with more being added to this month upon month, from your savings.

So, you’re not worried when your growth stocks fall.

When they rise, your portfolio burgeons, so…

…for all the above reasons…

…that’s why growth, too, apart from your value pursuits.

When it Pinches, Then You Buy

What is a good time to buy for the long-term?

Is there some kind of formula? Mathematical equation? Algorithm?

Who doesn’t look for the holy grail?

Sure, there are technicals galore, to assist one’s buying and fix its appropriate time. 

Of course, fundamentals, when studied properly, are even more helpful. 

However, neither technicals nor fundamentals can replace emotion.

The emotional alarm, when sounded, is a good time to buy for the long-term. 

Surprised?

Here you are, getting alarmed at how the markets are falling. 

How are you supposed to buy with a straight face amidst the panic?

That’s just it. 

Markets are wired in an opposite fashion to our mentality. 

At the onset of margin of safety, our mental framework emits panic upon seeing the mayhem. 

Upon the vanishing of margin of safety, the same mental framework emits euphoria and wants to participate in the rally. This is trading, not long-term investing, and as long as you buy high and sell higher, you are good. What you are not going to do here is hold your trade for the long-term, thinking it’s a long-term buy. What has not been bought with margin of safety is not a long-term hold. 

Why?

Margin of safety gives us a buffer. 

Let the markets fall; they still don’t reach our entry price. Or, they only fall a tad under it, and then start to rise again. That’s the beauty of buying with margin of safety. You can use the low now created to pick up some more, if you are still convinced about the stock. Otherwise, you can always exit the stock on a high. 

In long-tem investing, one should not exit on a low due to panic. If one does so, it’s like market suicide. 

What causes exits on lows?

Panic. 

Need for money.

Weak hands. 

Become a strong hand. 

Put in only that money which you don’t need for the next ten years. Make sure before entry that you won’t be pulling out this money in the middle of the investment if you can help it. Have a fallback family fund to lean on ready before you start putting money into the market for the long-term. 

Teach yourself not to panic. Rewire yourself alongside the market. This takes time. It took me almost a decade to rewire myself. Everyone needs to go through this rewiring process.

Once you’re rewired and  financially secure, your strong mind will pick up on the emotional trigger, and will start buying when the pinch-factor kicks in. 

Your strong hands won’t let go owing to panic. 

In the long run, your investment, which has been made with margin of safety and proper due diligence, will yield you a fortune.

Happy investing!

🙂

Bifurcation Ability – Do you have it?

No?

Develop it asap, please.

Otherwise, don’t be in more than one market. 

However, who is satisfied with just one market?

That would leave one with a lot of time on one’s hands, wouldn’t it?

Time on hands means looking for another market, and another, and another, till one’s time is fully occupied, and one’s thirst for market activity quenched. 

With multiple markets on one’s radar, one needs to bifurcate. 

As in time and mind compartmentalisation…

…which basically translates as…

…that when you’re working on the one market, you’re not letting any overhang from another market bother you. 

If an overhang is bothering you, take two, or take ten, or take however long it takes to kill the overhang. 

Loss, depression, profit, jubilation, exuberation, whatever cause or emotion is prevailing, let its effect come and let it go. Wait for it to go. Then open the next market. The last thing you want is for the other market to be observed and analysed while there’s emotional bias from a former market. 

Therefore…market done…market closed…next market. There’s no other formula here. 

Most market people are both traders and investors. 

This is the area where they really, really need to bifurcate and compartmentalise. 

Why?

Trading and investing involve diametrically opposite implementation strategies, that is why. 

If you’re making changes within your investment portfolio, but are still in the trading mindset, you are going to make major mistakes, which will most definitely disturb whatever balance you have managed to instill within your investment portfolio. 

Similarly, if you’re looking to open a trade and are still in the investing frame of mind, you are optimally poised to botch up your trade big time. 

This is how I approach the matter. 

I do a first half – second half thing. 

The first half during which the markets are open are for investment decisions. 

Then there’s lunch.

By lunch, I forget how the first half of the day has been spent. At least, I try and forget. 

I let the scrumptious lunch help me drown my memory. 

After lunch, the second half starts, which is dedicated to trading decisions.

Strategies used after lunch are diametrically opposite to the ones used before lunch. 

This works for me. 

There comes a time when there are no more investment decisions to be taken, at least for a while. Markets become expensive, and margin of safety vanishes. One is not thinking of entries. Exits are far, far away, as this is long-term investing. Here is when one can dedicate oneself to one’s trading. One’s got the whole day for it. It’s a great situation, because the need for bifurcation between trading and investing is gone. 

Then there comes a time where no trades are developing. Lovely.

Right, pack up, take a break, let’s go for a short and sweet holiday!

Benefit from a Small Entry Quantum

You enter the markets with an amount each time. 

That’s your selected quantum. 

The idea that’s being discussed here is as follows. 

Enter the market as many times as you want. 

Just do one thing before that. 

Adjust your quantum level to a point where it doesn’t pinch you, and…

… such that any entry mistakes make themselves felt only minimally, seen from an overall perspective.

In other words, keep your quantum of entry small.

Also, keep it constant, so that overall errors and benefits are able to average out in the long run.

Let’s get some picturization into play, to elucidate the concept. 

Let us assume that you wish to buy stock X for the long term, and you’ve decided upon staggered entry, many times, with quantum Y each time. 

You enter with one quantum Y on day A in the morning. By late afternoon, you are disappointed to see that the price has moved 5% against you. Happens. You start wishing that you had waited till late afternoon for entry. This can be classified as a random entry error through no fault of yours. Such random “errors” keep happening all the time in the markets. Get used to them.

Because your quantum Y was small, your “error” was also small. That’s the point being made here. 

You are going to enter with quantum Y many times. Sometimes, immediately after entry, price might move in your favour. There might be lesser slippage. You might get a gap-down entry. You might enter after a big correction. Overall, whatever goes in your favour gets written off against all “errors”, such that in the long run, over many entries, the effect of errors is nullified. 

Well you got me there. Nullified, I say. Then you ask what the entry error minimalization talk was all about, when it would get nullified in the first place. 

Which is when I ask that what was it that would lead to nullification?

Many, many entries, right?

What has preserved your capital enough to last for those many, many entries?

A small entry quantum.

Also, psychologically, you know that your small quantum translates into a small potential entry error for you. So, your psyche is all geared up and raring to go. It is not afraid of entry, or of the error you might make upon wrong entry. 

To sum up, at first, a small quantum works in your favour because it causes lesser potential entry error, seen as an amount. 

Then, because your entry quantum is small, your capital lasts for many, many entries, which is when one can start speaking of entry error nullification because of evening out. 

Whichever way you look from, it is the small entry quantum that works for you.

The Benefit of Quantum upon Quantum

Underlying equity. 

How do you protect against fraud and / or investor-unfriendliness?

You’ve done your research. 

All good. 

Stock is a buy. 

Meets your parameters. 

What’s the next step?

Protection. 

You buy quantum upon quantum. 

You don’t plunge into the stock with all you’ve got to give. 

No. 

You put in a quantum.

Then you wait. 

Better opportunity arises.

Fundamentals haven’t changed. All still good. 

You put in another quantum.

Quantum…

…upon quantum. 

That’s how you keep entering the stock till it keeps giving you a reason to enter. 

Year upon year. 

Between quanta, you’re studying behaviour. 

You’re looking for investor-friendliness. 

Your next quantum is only going in if investor-friendliness continues.

No more investor-friendliness?

No more quanta.

You wait.

Will investor-friendly behaviour resume?

And you wait.

Is it coming?

Yes. 

Good. 

Upon buy criteria being met, next quantum goes in. 

Not coming?

At all?

Ok. You’re looking to exit. 

Market will give you a high to exit. That’s what markets do. They give lows, and highs. 

Wait for the high. 

High?

Exit.